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ABSTRACT. Background. It is popularly believed that all suicide is the result of mental disorder. We have proposed the concept of “predicament suicide” – suggesting that suicide represents escape from intolerable circumstance, and while mental disorder may be one trigger, there are many others, such as social and economic difficulties. Objective. With a view to extending our understanding we explored thinking on this subject by Mao Zedong, one of the most influential figures of the 20th century. Conclusions. Mao strenuously held that suicide is caused by the social environment/society – he was particularly concerned with oppression and institutionalized disadvantage, which he sought to correct via revolution. His belief that “A person’s suicide is determined entirely by circumstances” corresponds precisely with the concept of “predicament suicide.”

Keywords: suicide; suicide prevention; women

How to cite: Pridmore, William, Said Shahtahmasebi, and Saxby Pridmore (2018). “Mao Zedong and Suicide Triggered by Social Predicament,” American Journal of Medical Research 5(1): 7–12.

Received 29 November 2017 • Received in revised form 14 January 2018
Accepted 15 January 2018 • Available online 29 January 2018

doi:10.22381/AJMR5120181

WILLIAM PRIDMORE
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Medical School, Australian National University,
Canberra, Australia
SAID SHAHTAHMASEBI
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The Good Life Research Centre Trust,
Christchurch, New Zealand;
Community Faculty, University of Kentucky,
Lexington, KY, United States
SAXBY PRIDMORE
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School of Medicine, University of Tasmania,
Hobart, Tasmania, Australia;
Saint Helen’s Private Hospital,
Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
(corresponding author)

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